Six feel-good shows to watch if you’re still pining for Heartstopper

Heartstopper, the beautiful upbeat and unapologetically queer coming-of-age story from Nick Nelson and Charlie Spring has been a huge hit since its debut on Netflix in late April, perhaps because it’s a burst of joy full of freshness. the air in these crazy times we live in.

Set in the fictional Truham Grammar High School in England, Heartstopper follows gay schoolboy Charlie (Joe Locke) and his relationship with rugby player Nick (Kit Connor), who discovers his sexuality, and a group of their close friends as they ‘they navigate life as teenagers, and all the issues they face – from bullying, to coming out, to homophobia, to transphobia – and at its center is a lot of heart.

Netflix has yet to officially confirm a second series, but a) as the show is based on YA author Alice Osman’s graphic novels and webcomics – of which there are currently four, with the fifth and last published in February 2023 – and b) it was such a hit with fans and critics alike – it would be criminal if we couldn’t follow Nick and Charlie’s love story.

Locke has previously said he’s excited for what might be in store for Charlie and Nick. “If we get another season, I can’t wait to see how they develop as a couple,” he told Britain’s GQ. “In the next graphic novel, Charlie struggles with his mental health and I’d like to explore that more…I’d like to approach those issues from a lighter perspective.”

As we cruise absolutely everything for Heartstopper Season 2 news soon, here are six shows to watch to feed that feel-good vacuum until then…

Love, Victor

Love, Victor

(Image credit: Hulu)

This teen comedy is a spin-off of the movie Love, Simon and is set in the same universe. Victor (Michael Cimino) is the new kid at Creekwood High School. Like Heartstopper, it deals with the realities of discovering who you are, the challenges it can pose, and the crucial role friendship and support play as you navigate your teenage life. Plus, it’s a real feel-good and life-affirming show and there are two series to catch up on before the third comes out later this year. Cool, right?

It was one of the wildest TV series of all time when it hit Hulu in 2020, so it’s a must-watch if you need a shot of those Heartstopper-esque feelings.

Where can I stream it?

Hulu (US), Disney Plus (UK, Australia)

Chewing gum

Chewing gum

(Image credit: Channel 4)

The incomparable Michaela Coel’s coming-of-age masterpiece is a hoot – you’ll laugh, cry and want the ground to engulf you in Tracey Gordon’s name as she sets out to explore the world beyond. beyond his religious and genderless upbringing.

Coel created, wrote and starred on the show, winning a BAFTA for Best Female Performance in a Comedy Program five years before her win for her opus I May Destroy You. Look for the brilliant Susan Wokoma as her no-nonsense sister Cynthia, and a pre-Bridgerton Jonathan Bailey as a dull, attractive creep.

Where can I stream it?

Britbox, Netflix, All4 (UK), HBO Max (US), Foxtel (Australia)

Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

(Image credit: Netflix)

As far as the feel-good factor goes, it’s like a big happy hug in primary colors. Yes, the show about a lady who lived in a cult bunker ended after four series in 2019, it really holds up to multiple viewings.

No less for every scene, Kimmy’s best friend is the amazing Titus Andromedon (Titus Burgess) (Special Mention to Pinor Noir song and Beyonce Hold Up video recreation) as well as Jane Krakowski as Jaqueline White, a character almost as emblematic as her. Jenna Maroney in 30 Rock.

Where can I stream it?

Netflix (worldwide)

flowers

flowers

(Image credit: Channel 4)

With some really excellent cameos in Heartstopper – Stephen Fry as the voice of the school principal, anyone? And Olivia Colman’s role as Nick’s mother was inspired casting.

The queen of the original comedy (Peep Show! W1A!) and the real queen (in The Crown), she sparkles as a music teacher mom in this superb dark comedy about the Flowers family, featuring a depressed father (Julian Barrett of The Mighty Boosh), their inventor son and their bipolar musician daughter, and they all live in the same old house.

The show manages to shine a sympathetic yet fun light on difficult issues in a beautiful way and deals with the reality of dealing with mental health issues in a darkly comedic way. One of the best things on TV of the last decade.

Acute

Acute

(Image credit: Hulu)

Starring comedian Aidy Bryant as the title character Annie and her gay best friend Fran (played by the amazing Lolly Adefope), this three-season show is based on the book by journalist Lindy West. It’s a fun and uplifting story about learning to love yourself – and being absolutely brilliant just the way you are. Writer Annie has a silly boyfriend, low self-esteem and a mother who makes unsolicited comments about her appearance.

On paper, it doesn’t sound very uplifting, but when she finds herself, it really is. When the show came out, author Lindy explained how the show challenges television stereotypes. “You don’t see fat being happy on TV,” she said. “If there’s a big character on TV, he’s sad. They try to lose weight, or they have a makeover montage, or they get punched in the head and think they’re beautiful because it’s an illusion. Hooray for positive change, right?

Where can I stream it?

Hulu (US), BBC iPlayer (UK), SBS On Demand (Australia)

I have never

I have never

(Image credit: Netflix)

The third season of this cute and smart comedy – written by Mindy Kaling – is coming to Netflix in August. It follows the story of teenager Devi Vishwakumar (Maitreyi Ramakrishnan), who struggles with the death of her father, her Indian-American identity, her relationship with her mother, and spends time in a wheelchair.

With, you know, all the other things that go on in high school. Like doing super squeaky things in front of your crush. The horror! Oh, and in a completely normal series of events, John McEnroe is the narrator. The fourth and final series is set to air in 2023.

Where can I stream it?

Netflix (worldwide)

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