Marisa Tomei wanted Aunt May to have a girlfriend: Sony’s Amy Pascal

The Walt Disney Company is back in the news this week, with many accusing the House of Mouse of not quite living up to the ideals it espouses with its rainbow capitalism. The Gay Days host has been called out in the media for supporting all Florida representatives supporting the so-called “Don’t Say Gay” Bill in the Sunshine State — well, the weather isn’t too good for LGBTQ+ students in kindergarten through third grade if the bill passes, advocacy organizations say. Instead of speaking out against the bill as requested by LGBTQ+ advocacy organizations, the company reconfirmed its commitment to making a difference by publishing LGBTQ+ content that will inspire young people.

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Much of Disney’s queer content hasn’t resonated with many members of its LGBTQ+ plus audience who feel the company is only willing to do a token representation with a bottom kiss here and a single line of dialog there. Then Disney canceled production of its most hyped queer content, Nimona, in 2021, citing pandemic concerns. On the other hand, Lucasfilm, a company Disney also owns, chose not to fire or sanction actors for transphobic and/or homophobic statements (yes, there were more than one), despite a history of other problematic behaviors.

As for Marvel Studios, the most likely candidate for on-screen queer representation because, at least in the past, Runaways and Jessica Jonesboth made under the defunct Marvel TV, have been hailed for being LGBTQ+ representative. Eternals provided the franchise’s first major big-screen gay superhero (though not the MCU’s first gay superhero), and Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness should also introduce America Chavez. However, it seems Marvel has fewer heroes who are openly queer onscreen these days, with many MCU favorites who are very gay in Marvel Comics source material appearing as not-so-gay onscreen ( Star-Lord, Korg, Ayo, Wiccan and Deadpool).


Related: The Cheaper Ad-Supported Disney+ Option Would Be Considered By Disney

Marisa Tomei wanted to make Aunt May LGBTQ+


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In a December 2021 interview with color geeksMarisa Tomei revealed she lobbied for Aunt May to date a woman from Tom Holland’s Spider Man trilogy, but Marvel Studios rejected the idea. The 57-year-old Oscar-winning actor has played Aunt May in the Marvel Cinematic Universe for Captain America: Civil War when she is visited by Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.), who comes to her apartment to recruit Peter Parker (Holland) for the first time. She then appeared in Spider-Man: Homecoming, Spider-Man: Far From Homeand more recently in Spider-Man: No Coming Home.

During the interview, Tomei revealed that before her character’s adventure with Happy (Jon Favreau), she thought it was a better idea for Aunt May to have a girlfriend. “There was a time when I felt like May — maybe she should just be with a woman because Ben is gone,” the actress said of Uncle Ben’s death. by Peter Parker. “And we kind of talked about it, and so I really wanted Sony’s Amy Pascal to be my girlfriend!”


The King of Staten Island The actress added, “I was like, ‘Nobody even needs to know, Amy. I’ll just be in a scene, and you’ll be there. And I’ll just be like, ‘Hey!’ It’ll just be a subtle thing.

Unfortunately, Marvel and Disney executives said no to Tomei’s idea of ​​hosting a coming out party for Aunt May. “No one went there at the time,” Tomei lamented. If this story had come true, anyway, Aunt May would have always loved Uncle Ben when they got married, and that means she was always bisexual, demiromantic or lesbian who figured it out later in life changes nothing. change the fact that she loved Ben while he was alive.

Watch the full interview below:


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